The Papers: A city 'born of grief' and call to end online hate

3 months ago 27

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By BBC News
Staff

Image caption, The Daily Express leads on news that the Queen has agreed Southend will be granted city status following the killing of MP Sir David Amess. It calls it a city "born of grief, love and respect", alongside a picture of Sir David's widow, Julia, who visited the church where he was killed.
Image caption, The Metro features a picture of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer and the SNP's Westminster leader Ian Blackford at a remembrance service for Sir David. It says Sir Keir, photographed with his head in his hands, was "anguished", and that "politicians of all parties united in grief".
Image caption, The i shows the three political leaders walking in a line outside of the church, and reports that MPs are insisting they will still meet members of the public in person without police presence. Stephen Timms, the Labour MP who was stabbed at his constituency surgery in 2010, says "we must not give up on accessibility", the paper reports.
Image caption, MPs bow their heads on the front page of the Guardian as they pay their respects to Sir David. Mr Johnson is facing called to introduce "David's law" to "crack down on social media abuse of public figures and end online anonymity", the paper reports. It says "allies of Sir David said he had voiced growing concern about threats and toxicity within public discourse".
Image caption, Sir David's family were "broken with grief", the Daily Mail says. The paper features a photograph of a man it says is 25-year-old Ali Harbi Ali, who is being held under the Terrorism Act following the stabbing. CCTV footage shows him heading to a station on Friday morning before the killing, the paper reports.
Image caption, The Mirror reports that almost 40 hours of "video rants" by radical preacher Anjem Choudary can still be found online - despite YouTube removing them when he was jailed in 2016. It says "one Google search provided 27 links" to content it says is "poisoning minds on the web".
Image caption, The Times says an independent review of the government's Prevent scheme will recommend that MI5 and counterterrorism police are "given a greater say on whether people at risk of radicalisation are placed on anti-extremism programmes". The paper cites sources saying it will claim the current "multi-agency approach" is "too soft on intervention".
Image caption, The Daily Telegraph leads on warnings from experts that the Covid booster jab programme in England "is moving too slowly to protect the most vulnerable". It reports that 3.7 million of 8.5 million eligible at-risk people have had a third dose - leaving 4.8 million people "in danger from waning immunity".
Image caption, The Financial Times reports that a "tighter monetary policy is on the way", with traders "betting that the Bank of England will increase rates from record lows as soon as November". They are betting that rates "will hit 0.5% - the central bank's threshold to begin unwinding its bond-buying programme - by February and 1% by August".
Image caption, And the Daily Star laments that parents are "no longer naming their lads Nigel". It says the "dark turn" in shortages comes after 18 months that have seen a lack of "bog rolls, truckers, CO2 and petrol".
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